PRACTICE ROLL

Load your camera

• The “bump” of the cassette faces down.
• The leader (skinny two-inch part) needs to be jammed into the slot of the take-up spool as far as possible. THIS IS IMPORTANT!
• Advance the film twice, so that it is wound entirely around the take-up spool.
• Close the back and advance the film twice more. MAKE SURE THAT THE REWIND KNOB SPINS EVERY TIME YOU ADVANCE THE FILM. If it doesn’t, you loaded your film incorrectly. Hana hou.

Adjust your camera

• Make sure that the little window on top of the film speed dial reads “400.”
• Set the film speed dial to “250.” (This means that the shutter will be open 1/250th sec.) THIS IS IMPORTANT!

Until I can show you a little more…

• Avoid photos that contain extremes, such as patches of sun and deep shadows. BRIGHT OVERCAST LIGHT IS GOOD! Clouds are your friends.
• Avoid photos indoors, such as upstairs in Midkiff.
•Avoid distant scenes (Pu’uloa, Puowaina, Leahi, etc.) I’ll explain.
• Rotate the aperture ring (the moveable ring on the lens closest to the camera body) and bring the needle to the center of the viewfinder. Do this each time you take a different photo under different lighting conditions. Measure the part you most want to come out.
• If you cannot easily measure what you want to measure, point the camera at an object with a neutral, middle gray tone that is lit in a similar way. Often the concrete at you feet works well.
• For at least a half dozen of your photos, turn the camera vertically. Avoid that boring horizontal look. In fact, do this with every roll you shoot. THIS IS IMPORTANT!
• Your heartbeat causes camera shake. Below 250th second, tuck your elbows in, stop your breath (briefly), and gently squeeze the shutter release. Never jerk the shutter release. THIS IS IMPORTANT!
• To minimize camera shake, hold the camera loosely (but not too loosely).

What to Shoot?

• Your shadow, or the shadows of a group of friends.
• Your reflection in a car window or mirror.
• Roots, bark patterns, or interesting patterns of leaves and bushes.
• Things stuck onto the outside of buildings: pipes, drains, etc.
• Anything else that interests you.